Setting up your Violin Practice Area

How to Set up your Practice Area for Effective Violin Practice

You are going to spend time each day with your instrument so it really pays to set up an environment conducive to effective practice after each Suzuki violin lesson.

Create a set space to practice in. This should be an area where there are few distractions and people aren’t coming in and out. It should also be somewhere where you will be able to hear yourself clearly as you play and possibly have a mirror to watch yourself playing.

Here are some things you might need to at home to practice effectively after your violin lesson:

  • Instrument
  • Music Stand
  • Music Books
  • Notebook with lesson notes and for recording practices
  • Pencil (2B or darker) and Eraser
  • Metronome
  • Tuner
  • Timer
  • Mirror
  • CD Player
  • Audio Recorder or Video Camera

Make sure your music stand is high enough that you can stand tall and see the music without dropping the position of your instrument.  We work a lot in lessons on having good posture with your body tall, shoulders and neck relaxed, holding your instrument high.  If you go home and practice slouched over to see your music you will find it difficult to progress.

It is very important to have your notebook nearby where you can leave it open in front of you.  We make an effort after lessons to make good notes of what you are learning.  If you can see them easily every time you play you will be able to stay focused during your practice time.  I’m sure like me you find there are too few hours for playing in a week, so make them count.  By the time your next lesson comes around, you want to have made significant progress on what we did in the lesson.

Use a pencil to write notes on your music! Tomorrow you will see them and more easily carry your progress and ideas forward to tomorrow’s practice session.

A Metronome, Tuner, and Timer are all very important tools for a musician.  The Metronome helps us keep a consistent beat, and regular use can help us to internalise a strong sense of pulse, something that helps distinguish the professional musician from the amateur.